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Édouard Marcel Sandoz Bronze Falcon Sculpture

This naturalistic bronze sculpture of a perching falcon was created in 1956 by the Swiss-French animalier Édouard Sandoz. The bird of prey is depicted in a dynamic pose at the edge of a rocky perch, perhaps on the verge of opening its wings, its eyes fixed on distant prey. As with all Sandoz animals, this falcon expresses Sandoz’ mastery of bronze, his intuitive sense of space and form, and his refined expression of the falcon’s essential nature.

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  • Product Details
  • Curator's Notes

Item #: B-20428
Artist: Édouard Marcel Sandoz
Country: France
Circa: 1956
Dimensions: 10" high x 7" wide x 17" deep
Materials:  Bronze
Signed: Dedication to Manfredo di Palma - Ed. M. Sandoz with Paris Foundry Mark
Literature: Félix Marcilhac, Sandoz, Sculpteur, Figuriste et Animalier, 1881-1971: Catalogue Raisonné de l'Œuvre Sculpté, Paris, 1993, p. 404, cat. no. 855
Exhibited: Cercle Volney, Harmonies dans la nature, Paris, 1956 (n^ 74) ; Société natio nale des beaux-arts, Paris, 1957 (n^ 850); Cercle Volney, Les Animaliers, Paris, 1958; jubilé Sandoz, Kunsthalle, Bâle, 1961 (n^ 1 )

Son of a pharmaceutical entrepreneur, Édouard Sandoz was a polymath, an artist in several media who was also active in the family business and in animal conservation. Blessed with a deep connection to animals, Sandoz founded the Société Française des Animaliers in 1933, as well as a wildlife sanctuary in partnership with his brother. Among artists who had influenced Sandoz' work was Franćois Pompon, an assistant to Rodin and creator of the pioneering polar bear sculpture, the monumental Ours Blanc, in the collection of the Musée d'Orsay. Contemporary photographs show the artist at work in his studio among a menagerie of unusual animals. The modeling of Sandoz' falcon compellingly conveys the bird’s capacity for speed, its athleticism, and the noble character that made it a favorite hunting companion of aristocracy.
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